Scotland & Hebrides

Scotland, Orkney and the Hebrides

What's happening in Scotland:

Thousands of local people like you are coming together in 2017 to clean your beautiful beaches, raise money, and fight the blight of plastic pollution.

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Local Beach Cleans

Get down to your nearest or favourite beach and join the front-line in the fight against plastic pollution.

47

SAS Beach cleans so far in 2017

1,138

of you so far this year have volunteered your time at a local beach clean

2,830kg

of plastic pollution removed from your beaches so far in 2017

C'mon Scotland
get stuck in!

Help make 2017 your best year yet and let's smash our targets...

Volunteers
1500
1138
Beach cleans
60
47

There are no upcoming Beach Cleans.

Why not step forward and Organise your own? It's a lot easier than you might think.

  • Beach clean

    Belhaven Beach Clean

    25 June
  • Beach clean

    Longniddry Beach Clean

    4 January
  • Beach clean

    Stonehaven Beach Clean

    4 January
  • Beach clean

    Portobello Beach Clean

    7 January
  • Beach clean

    Belhaven Beach Clean

    21 January
  • Beach clean

    Prestonpans Beach Clean

    11 February
  • Beach clean

    St Cyrus Beach Clean

    11 February
  • Beach clean

    Talisker Beach Clean

    19 February
  • Beach clean

    North Queensferry Beach Clean

    19 February
  • Beach clean

    North Berwick Beach Clean

    26 February
SAS Beach Clean

Organise your own SAS Beach Clean

Get stuck in and help us to protect the beaches you love in Scotland. We've made organising your own SAS Beach Clean as easy and fun as possible.

Find out how

Mini Beach Clean logo

Do your own #MiniBeachClean

If you can't come along to an upcoming Beach Clean then why not step up and organise your own.

Find out how

SAS Beach Clean Box

12
Beach Clean Boxes in Scotland

More about our Beach Clean Boxes

Funders

If you'd like to support our work in Scotland we'd love to talk to you.

Get involved

Protect what you love

the stunningly rugged Scottish coastline

If you love ...then help us protect it

Meet your Regional Reps

Dedicated local volunteers who are passionate about protecting your coastlines for everyone.

Katie Tunn

Katie Tunn

Isle of Skye
Emilie Devenport

Emilie Devenport

Edinburgh
Alice Kettle

Alice Kettle

Edinburgh
Brian Allen

Brian Allen

East Lothian
Amy Barclay

Amy Barclay

Aberdeenshire
Tom Hunter

Tom Hunter

Cullen
Vasiliki Papapanagiotou

Vasiliki Papapanagiotou

Edinburgh
Lily Copping

Lily Copping

Glasgow
Christie Middleton

Christie Middleton

Westport
Julien Moreau

Julien Moreau

North West Scotland
Alasdair Steele

Alasdair Steele

Edinburgh
Lauren Smith

Lauren Smith

Aberdeenshire
Gill Houlsby

Gill Houlsby

Isle of Skye

In their words...
why we love Scotland

Famed for its mountains, monsters, golf courses, glens, reef breaks, wilderness, remote beauty, cities, history and stunningly rugged coastlines, Scotland should be on every beach-lovers ‘to go list’. Amongst the picture postcards of Scotland’s rugged mountains and rolling glens are images of two significant bodies of water – one renowned for its “bonnie, bonnie, banks” and the other for something monstrous hidden in the depths…

We seek to protect the former and tackle the things beneath the surface, littering or polluting our coast.

From the white sandy beaches of the Hebrides, the world-class waves that firmly put Thurso and the North Shore on the map or a raft of other coves, breaks and sandy expanses – Scotland’s coastlines are a national treasure enjoyed by: watersports enthusiasts, nature-lovers, dog-walkers, ramblers and many, many more. These are the places we cherish to share with others or places where we retreat to in order to find solitude.

Formed from 790 islands and the top third of Britain’s landmass, the Scottish coastline stretches for a staggering 10,250, helped in no small part by the West coast being riddled with fjord-like sea lochs.

The striking, more urban, coastline of Scotland’s East Coast is a tourist honey pot with a far higher population and a wide range of beaches; from Coldingham Bay and Dunbar, south of Edinburgh, to the famous golden stretches around St Andrews and then on to Aberdeen.

North of the Firth of Forth and the scenery changes. Long famous for its powerful and dangerous waves, the remoteness and rurality of the north coast are in direct contrast with the hustle and bustle of the urban conurbations further south. The famous village of John O’Groats is nestled in the highlands, exactly 874 miles from its counterpart of Lands’ End, Cornwall. The RSPB nature reserve of Dunnet Head is the northern-most point of mainland UK.

Travelling down the West Coast, is more of a zig zag as the vast majority of the country’s coastline is in play here. Myriad islands and sea lochs, brooded over by the towering Ben Nevis, are exposed to the sheer, raw power of the north Atlantic.